How to Get Fire Smoke Out of Clothes: The Ultimate Guide

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Fire smoke can be a real pain to get out of clothes. Not only does it smell bad, but it’s also difficult to remove.

If you’ve ever had the unfortunate experience of being caught in a wildfire, you know how important it is to have the right cleaning supplies on hand.

In this guide, we will teach you how to get rid of the fire smoke smell from your clothes using simple and effective methods.

How to Wash Smoke-Damaged Clothes

A house fire is a traumatic event, and the aftermath can be overwhelming. One of the first things you’ll need to do is wash any clothes that were damaged by smoke.

Smoke particles are very small and can be difficult to remove, but with a little patience and care, you should be able to get your clothes looking fresh again.

Here’s what you’ll need to do:

First, pre-treat any heavily soiled areas with a stain remover. Be sure to test the remover on an inconspicuous spot first to ensure it doesn’t damage the fabric.

Then, fill a sink or tub with lukewarm water and add a gentle detergent. Soak the clothing for at least 30 minutes, then gently agitate before rinsing.

If the clothing is still stained, you can try soaking it in a mixture of vinegar and water for 30 minutes before washing. You can also add a cup of baking soda to the wash cycle to help remove any lingering smoke smells.

Once you’ve washed the clothing, hang it outside to air dry. The fresh air will help remove any remaining smoke smells. If you’re unable to hang the clothing outside, you can dry it in a clothes dryer on the lowest setting.

Once your clothes have aired out for 24 or more hours, spray them down with a half and half mixture of vinegar and water. Do this several times if your shirts, pants, jackets and clothing smell extremely smoky. Make sure to not let the clothing dry!

Put the clothes in the washing machine when they are still wet. Add 1 cup of vinegar and 1 cup of baking soda. Wash them like normal. When you’re done, put them in the dryer. If they smell like vinegar, don’t worry; it will go away on its own. If they smell smoky, wash them

Cleaning Smoke-Damaged Upholstery and Carpets

In addition to clothing, other items in your home such as upholstered furniture and carpets can also be damaged by smoke.

The good news is that these items can usually be cleaned and saved. Here are a few tips on how to clean smoke-damaged upholstery and carpets:

Use the vacuum cleaner to remove any soot or debris from the surface of the upholstery. Be sure to use a vacuum attachment so you don’t damage the fabric.

If the upholstery is still stained, you can try spot-cleaning with a mild detergent or upholstery cleaner. Test the cleaner on an inconspicuous spot first to make sure it doesn’t damage the fabric.

For carpets, start by vacuuming the entire surface to remove any loose soot or debris. Then, shampoo the carpet with a rental carpet cleaner or hire a professional to clean it for you.

With these tips, you should be able to remove the fire smoke smell from your clothes and other items in your home. Remember to take your time and be patient; the process may take a few tries but it will be worth it in the end.

Additional tips:

  • If you can’t get the smoke smell out of your clothes, try hanging them outside to air out for a few days.
  • You can also try using a dehumidifier in your home to help remove the smoke smell from your clothes and other items.
  • If you have any items that are severely damaged by smoke, you may need to throw them away. Consult with a professional if you’re not sure.

Bring Them To The Dry Cleaners

dry cleaner

If you have time before your clothes need to be worn again and want to ensure the smell is gone for good, bring them to the dry cleaners.

They will be able to get the smoke smell out of your clothes and have them looking brand new. This is probably the best option if you have expensive clothing or items that are difficult to clean on your own.

Imagine you had a closet full of expensive corporate clothes that smell like creosote, how long would it take you to launder them all? A day? Two days?

You might be able to get the smell out of some of them but not all. It’s better to be safe than sorry and just have a professional do it.

Hiring Smoke Damage Professionals

If you’re not comfortable cleaning the smoke damage yourself, you can always hire a professional to do it for you. Smoke damage professionals have the experience and equipment necessary to clean your home quickly and effectively.

They will also be able to advise you on what items can be saved and what needs to be thrown away.

When hiring a professional, be sure to ask for references and check their credentials. You should also get a written estimate of the cost before hiring them.

With these tips, you should be able to remove the smoke damage from your home and get it back to normal. If you have any questions or concerns, be sure to consult with a professional.

We hope this guide was helpful in teaching you how to get rid of the fire smoke smell from your clothes. Remember to take your time and be patient; the process may take a few days and washes.

Eugene Duke Pic

Hi, my name’s Eugene Duke and I love sitting by my fireplace reading a book and sipping on an adult beverage. Do you have a fireplace in your house? I’ll help you figure out the best type and style of fireplace for your home.

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